news


‘Make and Model’ hits operator revenue

Mobile operators could be losing revenue because more than half (58%) of users do not know the make and the model of their handset. So says a consumer research study conducted for LogicaCMG by Ipsos MORI which suggests the issue is a serious problem for operators and manufacturers trying to drive uptake of advanced data services.

The problem comes, according to LogicaCMG, because accurate handset details enable operators to market relevant extra services relevant to the user’s handset.

LogicaCMG’s research revealed just 42% of those surveyed knew the make and model of their handset. Half of all users (49%) know only the make, with a further one in ten (9%) knowing neither make nor model. No doubt reinforcing gadget-oriented stereotypes, men and younger users (in the 15 to 34 age group) are most likely to know the details of their handset. These groups are also those most likely to engage with advanced data services (such as MMS and mobile internet browsing) than women and the 55 plus age group.

While consumers themselves may not be overly interested in knowing the details of their phone, it is important for customer service specialists to know enough about the handset to be able to offer appropriate technical advice, LogicaCMG said.

Paul Gleeson, chief operating officer at LogicaCMG said: “This research demonstrates that many operators could well be trying to sell advanced data services based on the incorrect assumption that the users they are communicating with have basic knowledge of their own handsets. Often this is not the case; the language used by the customer service advisor can be inappropriately technical and, as a result, they could actually be putting a number of people off using their handsets.”

Tags:

Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

Polls

Should privacy be treated as a right to protect stringently, or a commodity for users to trade for benefits?

Loading ... Loading ...