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Viavi bags Slicing Packet Network win with China Mobile

Business partners greeting each other. Mixed media . Mixed media

Viavi has announced it has started working with China Mobile to introduce 5G service in China by the end of 2019.

The partnership will focus more specifically around the development of Slicing Packet Network (SPN) with FlexE interface. This technology has been deemed as a priority by China mobile to support next-generation architecture, bandwidth, traffic model, network slicing, latency and time synchronization.

“Viavi has been honoured to collaborate with China Mobile on analysing 5G network scenarios and proposing technology strategy,” said Viavi CEO Oleg Khaykin. “In order to realize China Mobile’s vision of introducing 5G service by the end of 2019, principal technologies including SPN for transport must be standardized by the ITU-T. We have advanced our test technology to meet this objective, and our solutions are ready to support the China Mobile ecosystem of partners to deliver interoperable network infrastructure.”

FlexE will be used with SPN to create smaller Ethernet channels from a larger one, or vice versa, to guarantee quality of service and isolation between slices at the transport layer. SPN is an area which has seemingly been getting China Mobile all hot and bothered recently, as the telco has requested the ITU look more specifically at the standardization of the technology.

And if that hasn’t got your blood pumping enough below is an SPN diagram, assuming of course you haven’t already had your SPN fix.

SPN

  • 2020 Vision Executive Summit

  • LTE Advanced Pro and Gigabit LTE: The Path to 5G

  • TechXLR8

  • The BIG Communications Event

  • 5G North America

  • 5G World


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