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We’re more than networks now – ETSI

Salesman painting tree instead of city

Transformation is one of the most common buzzwords in the telecoms world and it seems not even standards bodies can stand against the tides of change.

The world is changing, and changing very quickly. Operators are being pitted against new and unknown competitors, while profits are being sucked out of the telecoms sector. This change means companies have to play in new ballparks, to different rules, and the same can be said for ETSI.

“I don’t think ETSI will be doing the same thing in five years what it was doing five years ago,” said David Boswarthick, Director of Committee Support Center at ETSI.

ETSI’s bread and butter work to date has naturally been focused on the network. And while work here will never be complete, it is becoming less stressful. Projects are completed and new focus areas arise. Like augmented reality for instance.

Eventually operators will start making money out of next generation technologies like AR, but for the moment the foundations are being laid. And what is crucial to these foundations is bringing new stakeholders into the equation. ETSI’s AR working group is one of those which operates further up the value chain. Yes, there are networking questions to be asked, but the technology is much more consumer orientated. The purpose of this group is to assess the landscape, before moving onto standardization projects for the interfaces between devices and an industry accepted framework.

The problem with technologies like AR is that they tend to fall between the cracks. It traverses across so many different sectors, it is difficult for someone to be able to take control. Unfortunately this can lead to some disappointing results. Right now there are three companies (who shall remain nameless) who are dominating the AR space. The technology is proprietary and siloed right now which is a problem.

While some people would consider standards as a limitation for technologists and blue-sky thinkers, Boswarthick highlighted they are crucial for success in the long-run. AR has been walking down the proprietary path for some time unchecked, but to make sure the consumer and the wider ecosystem benefit, there has to be a process of checks and balances. This is what ETSI plans to oversee; the process of creating interoperability and a sustainable ecosystem.

But this is where the complications lie; ETSI has little or no experience in dealing with industry verticals. There are a few industry members in the groups right now, Siemens and Bosch are two examples, but more are needed. “ETSI getting close to the vertical domains is a tough nut to crack,” said Boswarthick, but considering industry players will influence and define applications on the network, they are needed in the conversation from the beginning.

This is one of the first examples of ETSI expanding into new areas, but there will be more. Autonomous vehicles for instance will muddy the waters with new players in the ecosystem, as will smart cities. ETSI certainly isn’t forgetting about its tried and tested playground, but this organization is going to be much more than networking before too long.


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