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New Euro Android charges could be $40 per device

Android_green_figure,_next_to_its_original_packaging

Google announced earlier this week that it was going to start charging Android smartphone makers for its apps but didn’t say how much.

Tech site The Verge, however, reckons it has got hold of some documents that detail the tariffs Google intends to impose on its blameless OEM partners to make sure it doesn’t lose a single euro of profit while it wrestles with the European Commission’s trust busters. According to this ‘confidential fee schedule’ Google could demand as much as $40 per device, it’s alleged.

But these monetary considerations could just end up being bargaining chips in a process through which Google forgoes the cash so long as OEMs play ball by preinstalling all the stuff it wants. In other words Google seems to be saying “We won’t insist our stuff is bundled with Android but we will fine anyone who doesn’t.”

In that context the actual amounts involved seem irrelevant, since Google may well write them off in exchange for docile compliance, but we’ve only done three paragraphs so we might as well have a look at how they will be calculated. Essentially OEMs will have to pay more for larger screens and for exporting to richer countries. So a top-end device into the UK could be stung for $40, while a rubbish phone into Greece might only cost an extra couple of bucks.

Google seems to be somewhat sulkily throwing down the gauntlet to the EC by saying “OK, two can play at that game – if you won’t let us bundle then we’ll punish OEMs. How do you like them apples?” The EC will presumably have a bit of a think about whether this new tactic still represents an abuse of Google’s market dominance and then act accordingly.

  • TechXLR8


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