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EU divided on digital tax

tax cut

Fears over a reaction from the US has sent Finance Ministers from Ireland, Sweden and Denmark cowering back to their spreadsheets as the EU digital tax hits an early stumbling block.

While the collective bargaining power and protection afforded by the European Union is certainly useful, the cumbersome nature of the bureaucratic beast and unanimous decision making ensures it is anything but. As with many proposed rule changes in the past, objections from a handful of member states have slammed the emergency brakes on the digital tax, aimed at holding the internet giants accountable.

According to the Guardian, the Finance Ministers of Ireland, Sweden and Denmark have all aired their criticism not on the concept of the tax, but fears over what President Trump might suggest as a retaliation. There’s a pragmatic approach to business and there’s spineless appeasement to a bully, we’ll let you decide which one this is.

Of course, it would be unfair to herd all of the EU member states into the same cowardly-corner as Ireland, Sweden and Denmark. 12 member states are already moving ahead with their own plans to create a localised digital tax, including the UK as was announced during the Autumn Budget, and some are acting somewhat hawkish about it. The French Government has suggested it would like the tax rates on the playing field by the end of 2018, though Germany seems to be favouring a more watered-down version of the rules.

The EU wide tax on those taking advantage of creative tax regimes, would be the best solution however. A united front against the slippery Silicon Valley internet giants, as well as those from other nations around the world, would of course be the best way to claim that 3% of local revenues, but it is becoming more difficult to imagine that a reality.

The fainthearted trio do of course have something to worry about. Despite Trump slapping tariffs on Chinese goods, and threatening to revamp tax laws so Amazon cannot take advantage of the US tax havens, he would most likely take the US tax as an attack on American values and a threat to the borders. The President is a man or rarely recognises consistency and before too long will probably be describing Jeff Bezos as a close family friend who have been relentlessly pursued by the penny-pinching Europeans.

Ireland also has a lot to lose. After proving it was incapable of managing its finances in a responsible way, the technology giants could be seen as somewhat of a saviour to the economy. Apple, Facebook and Google are just a few names who house a considerable base in the country. Ireland certainly has its own interests to protect.

It’s disappointing to see such weak behaviour in the face of an orange-hued, bullying politician, but at least there are some nations who are prepared to go it alone and hold the internet giants accountable to fair taxation.


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