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Is ‘superfast’ enough to pry an extra tenner from our wallets for 5G?

Verizon motorola 5g

The US market is one which has suffered in the ‘race to the bottom’ but a $10 add-on for 5G connectivity from Verizon is certainly an interesting way to get ARPU heading the other direction.

With 5G networks officially ‘running’ in various markets around the world, one of the big questions which remained is how much the telcos would actually charge for the superfast bonanza. Verizon has been one of the first to twitch off the starting line with a new offer which will use 5G as somewhat of an ‘added value’ proposition to existing and new subscribers, and only for $10 a month.

“Continuing our track record of 5G ‘firsts,’ we are thrilled to bring the first 5G-upgradeable smartphone exclusively to Verizon customers,” said Verizon’s CTO, Kyle Malady.

“Not all 5G networks are the same. Verizon’s 5G Ultra-Wideband network is built by the company with the nation’s best and most reliable 4G LTE network. It will change the way we live, work, learn and play, starting in Chicago and Minneapolis and rapidly expanding to more than 30 US markets this year.”

Starting in Chicago and Minneapolis the 5G euphoria will quickly spread throughout the US. What is worth noting is coverage will of course be limited in the first instance, but that will unlikely be a roadblock for the early adopters who want to have 5G for the sake of having 5G.

For those who are concerned the network will be available without the compatible devices, Verizon has also partnered with Motorola to launch what the telco is promising will be the world’s first 5G smartphone. The device itself will not be 5G compatible, but users will have the option to purchase a 5G moto mod, which can be attached to the devices to plug into the superfast networks.

What we’re more interested in here is the sales strategy.

This has been one of the big questions which the industry has faced over the last couple of months; how will 5G connectivity be sold to the consumer? As it stands, there are few demands on the consumers digital lifestyle which are not answered by 4G. This will not be the case in a few years when new products and services emerge, but right now, 5G is an answer without a question; it’s a tricky conundrum for the telcos.

This is an interesting approach from Verizon however. We suspect anyone selling a 5G contract to subscribers will face failure, aside from the early adopters, though positioning the superfast connectivity as an add-on to subscriptions could be an interesting way to gain traction. And then there is the price.

$10 extra each month is affordable, and it is a very good play on nuance. If Verizon attempted to sell subscribers 5G connectivity for $60 a month, most would probably ignore it. However, by selling a 4G contract for $50 a month and offering an upgrade for $10, more would possibly consider it. It’s fundamentally the same outcome, but clever manipulation of the customer could achieve the desired results.

Buying something for $60 a month is scary, because that is a lot of money, but adding on an extra $10 onto a necessity becomes much more palatable. It’s the very same reason Netflix or Amazon Prime are priced so low compared to some other premium content platforms; spending $10 a month doesn’t sound like it will break your bank account, but scale of subscribers makes a difference for the provider.

While we still believe consumers are too cash conscious for consumer 5G tariffs to be a roaring success in the immediate future, this is certainly an interesting approach to generating ROI. Other telcos should take note, this is the sort of initiative which will give the best opportunity for success.

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