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Ofcom outlines plans for 2019/20

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With the country on the verge of realising the promise of the digital economy, the pressure is still on Ofcom to make sure a fair and sustainable landscape is developing. Here, the team outlines its plans for the next twelve months.

“It’s a great way of being able to explain why our work matters and what some of the areas are we want to give a particular focus to,” said Ofcom CEO Sharon White. “And it’s also a way of being able to be held accountable for those areas.

“This year we’re talking about two big consumer themes. Fairness for customers, how do we make sure whether your getting broadband or mobile, you’re getting a great deal, a fair deal from your provider, and the other big these is better broadband, better mobile wherever you live.”

The plan itself actually focuses on four areas. Firstly, better connectivity. Secondly, fairness for customers Thirdly, supporting UK broadcasting. And finally, raising awareness of online harms.

Starting with better connectivity, over the next 12 months the Government’s planned universal broadband service will be getting more attention, while the team will continue to focus on opening up access to BT’s network of underground ducts and telegraph poles. Addressing the mobile not-spots, more airwaves will hit the auction lots and it would be a fair assumption more coverage obligations will be heading towards the telcos.

On the fairness side, work will continue to ensure operators are being more transparent when informing customers about the best available deals and tariffs. One area which has been prioritised is for those customers who pay for their handsets bundled with airtime, or those who pay more because of their contract status.

Looking at UK broadcasting, the message here seems to be value for money and ensuring public service broadcasting is still fit for purpose. A lot has changed over the last five years, look at the growth of OTT streaming services and downfall of linear TV, and there is a feeling something needs to change to ensure public funds are being spent in the best interest of those who pay the taxes in the first place.

Finally, in terms of the final part of the programme, this will be a tricky one. There is of course a need for consumers to be more aware of the dangers of the digital economy, but this is an area which has been largely ignored to date. No-one is particularly to blame here, as without the consequences it becomes very difficult to educate on dangers and be taken seriously. That said, there have been plenty of scandals and data breaches in recent memory to give Ofcom ammunition.

With the 5G dawn breaking and the increased drive for fibre finally hitting home in the UK, there is plenty to be excited about but much work which needs to be done. An excellent example of this is the Which report panning ISPs for failing to deliver on consumer expectations. Telcos are traditionally slow-moving beasts, though technology developments are increasingly speeding up, dominating more of our lives, change might have to be forced through.

Ofcom not only needs to ensure there is an effective landscape for the telcos to thrive, it needs to ensure these benefits are being passed across to the consumer and the economy. The next twelve months promise a very business time for Ofcom employees.

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