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Huawei lawyers-up in North America

Huawei’s CFO is suing Canada, while the company is also reportedly set to sue the US government.

While the US and Huawei kept their conflict muted during Mobile World Congress last week, they have wasted little time in picking up where they left off after that brief hiatus. Having said that there was widespread talk on the show floor last week that there were many representatives of the US government and other public institutions at the event, apparently canvassing for support.

Anyway, the BBC reports that last Friday Huawei’s CFO, Meng Wanzhou, filed a civil suit against Canada for breaching her civil rights when it arrested her late last year. The move coincided with the official commencement of her extradition process to the US, which wants to try her for a bunch of alleged crimes. Her case seems to rest on some perceived irregularities in the process by which she was arrested, but is probably part of a broader coordinated legal counter-attack by Huawei.

Meanwhile Huawei is also preparing to sue the US government, according to multiple reports, the first of which seems to have come from the New York Times. This suit is apparently unconnected to the latest US offensive, and concerns the much older ruling that banned US federal agencies from using Huawei products.

Once more, however, this would appear to be part of a greater legal push against the US by Huawei. In this case, by suing the US and therefore obliging it to defend itself, the cunning plan could be to bring specific allegations into the open, which Huawei could then refute. One of the biggest criticisms of the US war on Huawei has been a lack of specifics, so this seems like a plausible tactic.

At this stage it’s still really difficult to see how the war between the US and Huawei will play out. On one hand momentum seems to be against Huawei, with US allies feeling compelled to at least go through the motions of siding with it. On the other, if Huawei can publicly demonstrate that a significant proportion of the charges against it are unfounded, then maybe it can start to swing some Western public opinion its way. Either way both sides seem dug-in for a long conflict.

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