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$3.4 billion Inmarsat acquisition hype turns out to be true

British satellite communications company Inmarsat has been the centre of numerous acquisition stories in recent years, and this one is actually progressing.

Last week, the Inmarsat board released a statement confirming it was in preliminary discussions regarding a takeover, and today it has confirmed an offer is on the table. Not only will this put $3.4 billion into the pockets of the shareholders, it will also take the firm back into private equity, protecting it from the roller-coaster ride which has been the satellite segment over the last few years.

“As experienced and long-term investors in telecommunications, the Consortium values and admires Inmarsat for its proven expertise in maritime, aviation, defence and broadband satellite communications, alongside its strong market positions and potential for growth,” a statement from the consortium reads.

“Our planned ownership will enable this innovative British company to fulfil its ambitions to become a global leader in next-generation satellite communications, including the fast-growing market for commercial aviation in-flight connectivity.”

Another important factor from the statement is that the Inmarsat headquarters will remain in London. This might have been a bit of an issue for any protectionist politicians which would have viewed Inmarsat as strategic national asset, but the consortium seems to be getting ahead of the game. Should the firm gain regulatory approval, the deal is expected to be completed in Q4 this year.

The consortium, named Triton Bidco, believes there is much growth to be realised in the satellite segment, though a “strategic management and a long investment horizon” is required. In short, if you want to see the profits, shareholder pressures need to be removed from the equation. The firms traditional markets, maritime and government, are becoming increasingly competitive, but with its global infrastructure and early entry into the in-flight connectivity market the consortium has clearly spotted some riches on the horizon.

With a price of $7.21 in cash per share (a 7% premium), as well as the support of the Board of Directors and its largest shareholder Lansdowne Partners, Inmarsat might be heading towards the consortium. Shareholders have been frustrated over recent months with weak earnings results and may well look to exit with some spending money. For Inmarsat, the deal will create some much-needed breathing room to explore the long-term role of satellite in tomorrow’s world of connectivity.

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