news


Facebook leads corporate cryptocurrency initiative Libra

Social media giant Facebook has announced the launch of Libra, a ‘stablecoin’ apparently designed to revolutionise the digital payments market.

Such ambition would be highly questionable if it weren’t for the fact that Facebook has managed to get loads of other blue-chip companies involved, including Visa, Mastercard, PayPal and Coinbase. This gives the project a sense of scale and legitimacy that it wouldn’t have if this was just another gimmick to help Facebook exploit its users once more.

“Libra’s mission is to create a simple global financial infrastructure that empowers billions of people around the world,” blogged Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg. It’s powered by blockchain technology and the plan is to launch it in 2020. This is especially important for people who don’t have access to traditional banks or financial services. Right now, there are around a billion people who don’t have a bank account but do have a mobile phone.”

Blockchain is a pretty complicated business, so to get how this works we recommend you go to the Libra site, read the Libra white paper and watch the videos below. Libra is described as a ‘stablecoin’, which means its value is pegged to regular currencies and thus won’t fluctuate like Bitcoin famously does. There’s also talk of almost no fees, so it will be interesting to see what incentive all the members of the Libra consortium have to participate.

Facebook’s own interests will be represented by a subsidiary called Colibra, which will produce a digital wallet that will be available in Facebook’s messaging apps as well as its own standalone one. “From the beginning, Calibra will let you send Libra to almost anyone with a smartphone, as easily and instantly as you might send a text message and at low to no cost,” said the announcement. “And, in time, we hope to offer additional services for people and businesses.”

This seems like a very ambitious project, the motives for which are still somewhat unclear. The narrative is all about extending financial services to the unbanked, but you have to assume Facebook expects to monetise this service eventually. The prospect of a company that unilaterally excludes any users it disapproves of being in control of a global currency is chilling.

 


Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Polls

Should privacy be treated as a right to protect stringently, or a commodity for users to trade for benefits?

Loading ... Loading ...