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Italy readies itself for tax assault on Silicon Valley

The Italian Government is preparing to join the UK and France in taking a tougher tax stance against Big Tech with the introduction of a 3% sales tax.

Designed to target the elusive technology giants which have been slipping between the mountains of red-tape to take advantage of cheaper tax destinations, the levy will be based against revenues realised in the market as opposed to tax. While it might be possible to move profits to different markets in the bloc, it is much more difficult to disguise payments taken from individuals who physically reside in Italy.

While it still might be early days in tackling the abuses of the taxation landscape, momentum is starting to gather. According to sources, the new tax regime could be announced during the next budget and set in place January 2020. The new budget from the coalition is due to be submitted to the European Commission today [October 15].

Although details are relatively thin for the moment, take any predictions or leaks with a pinch of salt. It would be fair to assume Italy is heading down the same route as the UK and France in holding Silicon Valley accountable to a fair and reasonable tax position, though due to the complicated political situation in the country, what form this could take is unknown for the moment.

During the 2018 Italian election, no political group or party won an outright majority resulting in a hung parliament. Numerous coalition governments could have been formed, and after a few failed attempts, the centre-left Democratic party and the anti-establishment Five Star Movement were sworn in last month.

These policies have been in the works for some time now, though what eventually comes out of the wash remains to be seen. Interesting enough, the failure of this latest coalition could force the country into another election, potentially a new government and perhaps a new line on tackling Big Tech.

That said, the only thing which is clear coming out of this political kafuffle is that Silicon Valley is a target.

Across Europe there are several member states who are becoming increasingly frustrated with the flamboyance of the internet giants accounting departments. There are of course a few who have scuppered a pan-European approach to new digital tax rules, the likes of Ireland and Luxembourg of course benefit from the unfair status quo, though with several member states going it alone, the writing is on the wall for Big Tech.

This is just one element of the changing landscape for tech. Alongside a rethink on tax rules, regulation and legislation governing data, privacy, surveillance, free speech, political advertising and artificial intelligence are in the works. Governments and regulators are attempting to drag bureaucracy and the rulebook into the digital era, and it might be a bit uncomfortable for some of Silicon Valley’s residents.


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