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Google writes opening line of Huawei smartphone obituary

grave hole

Huawei’s next flagship smartphone will not feature official Google applications as the weight of the US ban finally hits home.

Speaking to reporters in the US, and first reported by Reuters, a Google spokesperson said the Huawei Mate 30 rumoured to be launched in October, cannot be sold with licensed Google apps and services. This is a significant setback to Huawei’s consumer division and begs the question as to whether anyone would now consider the devices without the Android OS and supporting app ecosystem.

The blow from Google of course leads back to the White House. In entering Huawei and its affiliate companies on the Entity List, US suppliers are banned from supplying any products, components or services to the Chinese vendor. This includes Google, with its horde of popular applications and platforms.

There has of course been a moment of reprieve for some US suppliers. President Trump said there will be an extension on the ‘grace period’ afforded to Huawei and its US supply chain, though Google has now stated this only applies to devices which are already on the market. As long as the conflict between Beijing and Washington persists, it looks like the new Huawei devices will have a Google-shaped hole in them.

Although Google has not confirmed whether it has applied for an exemption from the ban, it has said in previous months it wishes to continue working with Huawei. Of the 130 applications sent to the US Commerce Department to seek a special licence to continue working with Huawei, none have been accepted thus far.

This is of course not as simple a situation as one might expect. Google owns Android, the open-sourced operating system. Huawei is not banned from using Android, it can’t be, but it is banned from being an official Android partner of Google. This means it will not be entitled to security and performance updates as soon as there are available. It can use the basic Android building blocks, but it will effectively have to build its own OS, which it has pretty much already done, but it will be a completely different product.

The confirmation from Google here is the news many Huawei fans will not want to have heard. The Mate 30 will not feature popular applications such as Google Maps, or the Goole Play Store where users can download other apps. These are only two examples, though they are critical elements of any Android smartphone.

The question which remains is whether anyone will buy a Huawei smartphone now?

We suspect not, assuming they have kept up-to-date with developments or done the slightest bit of research. There will of course be a market for Huawei in China, there is a sense of patriotism there propping up the business, though this could be the beginning of the end for Huawei in Western (perhaps all international?) markets.

A Google-less future is the new status-quo for Huawei, and unless this changes quickly, we suspect its smartphone business will be a shadow of its former-self in a very short period of time.

For those who have been plotting and scheming the downfall of Huawei, this is the first sign of success. For months, the Chinese vendor seemed to be immune to the collateral damage from the US/Chinese trade-war, though now it has finally hit home.

The consumer business unit has been very kind to Huawei executives over the last couple of years. Thanks to the creation of consumer devices which performed well and were reasonably-priced, and an extensive above-the-line advertising campaign to drive the Huawei brand, Huawei has become one of the most popular consumer electronics brands worldwide. It has consistently been the number two smartphone brand for shipments globally in recent years, while the consumer business group is now the largest contributor to group revenues at the firm.

In its recent financial statement, Huawei reported another year-on-year revenue increase, though it did appear growth in the smartphone business was driven by domestic smartphone sales. Research from Canalys suggests smartphone sales in Western Europe were down for the second quarter by 16%, with Samsung and Xiaomi benefitting. Unless the situation changes, we cannot see anything but a dramatic decline in Huawei smartphone sales in Western markets, and perhaps this misery will spread to all of Huawei’s international market.

This is currently an incredibly profitably and valuable business to Huawei executives and shareholders, though now it appears it has been cut-down at the knees by the White House and the Trump administration.


One comment

  1. Londonnut 29/08/2019 @ 11:04 pm

    All the media hype about the inability to include the Google apps out of the box is a bit ott. You would be able to side load these without much effort I’m sure…

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