news


AT&T gets streaming with HBO Max

Gone are the days when the consumer could get all the content they wanted in one place as AT&T’s WarnerMedia joins the streaming landgrab.

With Netflix, Amazon Prime, Hulu, Disney, HBO and numerous other streaming services on the market before too long, the fragmentation of content is looking like it could be a serious problem for the consumer. Whether splitting the spoils has an overarching negative impact on the segments profits remains to be seen, but customers wallets can only be pushed so far; how many streaming services can each customer be expected to have?

That said, AT&T is in a strong position with this proposition. In HBO, it owns a lot of promising content already, playing into consumer nostalgia, and it does seem to be heading in the right direction in terms of original programming.

“HBO Max will bring together the diverse riches of WarnerMedia to create programming and user experiences not seen before in a streaming platform,” said Robert Greenblatt, Chairman of WarnerMedia Entertainment and Direct-To-Consumer.

“HBO’s world-class programming leads the way, the quality of which will be the guiding principle for our new array of Max Originals, our exciting acquisitions, and the very best of the Warner Bros. libraries, starting with the phenomenon that is ‘Friends’.”

With the service set to debut in Spring 2020, AT&T is promising 10,000 hours of programming from the outset. Full series of ‘Fresh Prince of Bel Air’, ‘Friends’ and ‘Pretty Little Liars’ will feature in the content library, as well as new dramas such as ‘Batwoman’ and ‘Katy Keene’.

Looking at future Max Original series, the list is quite extensive. ‘Dune: The Sisterhood’ is an adaptation of Brian Herbert and Kevin Anderson’s book based in the world created by Frank Herbert’s book Dune. ‘Lovecraft Country’ is a horror series based on a novel by Matt Ruff. ‘The Plot Against America’ will be a reimagined history based on Phillip Roth’s novel.

The ingredients are all in place to ensure AT&T makes a sustained stab at cracking the streaming market which has been dominated by the OTTs to date. There are a couple of questions which remain however.

Firstly, pricing. Can executives price the service competitively while also sustaining investments in content? Secondly, experience. Will the platform meet the high-expectations set by consumers thanks to the high-bar set by Netflix? And finally, culture. Will AT&T allow WarnerMedia to operate as a media business or will it impose the traditional mentality of telcos onto the business?

AT&T has bet big on the content world and it can ill-afford to fluff its lines on its debut. Having signed an $85 billion deal to acquire Time Warner and spent what seems like decades battling various government departments to authorise the transaction, the telco will need to see some ROI sooner rather than later.

The question is whether the momentum in the streaming world can be sustained. Platforms like Netflix, Hulu and Amazon Prime were attractive in the early days because there was consolidation of content onto a single library. With more streaming services becoming available, the fragmentation of content might well become a problem before too long. Consumers will have to make choices on what service to subscribe to, limiting the profits of the individual providers.

The days of subscribing to everything might be a thing of the past before too long; wallets can only be pushed so far.

Diversification into profitable segments is certainly a sensible strategy in the days of meagre connectivity profits, but $85 billion is a lot to spend on a hunch.

  • Video Exchange MENA


Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Polls

Should privacy be treated as a right to protect stringently, or a commodity for users to trade for benefits?

Loading ... Loading ...