news


30 Attorney Generals on verge of announcing Google probe – sources

Sources familiar with the matter have suggested an antitrust probe involving more than 30 State Attorney Generals could be launched as soon as next Monday.

Although the specifics of the investigation are yet to make it into the public domain, the threat is looming large for Google. Three separate sources have suggested Google is in the crosshairs, according to the Washington Post, another incremental step in the US as lawmakers look to dilute the power and influence of one of Silicon Valley’s poster boys.

Comments are difficult to come by, though lawyers are seemingly ready to down weapons and reach across the political divide to address a growing debate. Bickering politicians can usually be relied on to be lethargic and ineffective, though it seems Silicon Valley is antagonising Washington enough to force friendships in an increasingly hostile and partisan political climate.

That said, it would surprise few if the investigation is officially launched next week, as there have been various public offices stating their disapproval over the power and influence Google wields.

The crux of the issue is a simple one; should a company like Google be able to access such vast amounts of information. If data is the new oil, Silicon Valley is OPEC. Combining this potential gold mine with the already bulging bank accounts could create a worrying position.

One question which remains is how responsibly companies like Google are exerting this power. Are the internet giants fuelling campaigns of defensive acquisition, swallowing up potential competitors to prevent a dilution of market share? Are initiatives being implemented to prevent growth of these rivals and kill an idea before it can even consider scaling? These are areas which could be deemed monopolistic, an abuse of a dominant position, a big no-no in today’s world.

The monopolistic accusations are just a single element of the mix though. Conservative voices have suggested the left-leaning internet giants are demonstrating bias, offering prominence to some political commentary and hiding certain opinions.

“If big tech companies are not living up to their commitments and representations regarding being open to all political viewpoints and free of bias and restrictions on the basis of policy preference, then they should be held accountable for their false, misleading and deceptive trade practices,” said Texas First Assistant Attorney General Jeff Mateer.

Mateer and the Texas Attorney General office believe Google has been restricting the advertisement of some Republican political events, while Facebook has been censoring pro-Trump articles and Twitter limited the visibility of Republican politicians. These are unproven claims right now, but they demonstrate the ‘us’ and ‘them’ mentality which is a common theme though the relationship between Silicon Valley and Washington.

For the politicians, the perceived preference of the internet giants on political matters is another reason power and influence should be diluted. An antitrust investigation, gathering 30 Attorney Generals behind the same cause, could be one way to tackle the problem.

Another area which is unclear is the extent of such a probe. Google has been named as the party of interest in this report, though it would surprise few if the likes of Amazon, Twitter or Microsoft were dragged into the fray also; Silicon Valley is increasingly becoming Enemy Number One in Washington.


Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Polls

Should privacy be treated as a right to protect stringently, or a commodity for users to trade for benefits?

Loading ... Loading ...