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Government policy has held UK back in pursuit of digital economy

While the investment climate for connectivity infrastructure has certainly been improving in recent years, a proactive and prioritised government is critical to ensure rapid evolution to the digital economy.

Across the world, the climate for investment in connectivity infrastructure is improving. There is plenty of demand from both the consumer and governments to build the business case for deployment of fibre infrastructure, though more could still be done in certain markets.

“The digital economy does not work without the government, especially in the rural areas,” said Dick Van Schooneveld of Mahler Corporate Finance at Total Telecom Congress this week.

This is the challenge which some telcos and governments are facing when it comes to attracting investment; the political and regulatory environment is not always very helpful. There are some bright spots across the world, Portugal for example as well as Sweden or South Africa, but some are lagging considerably.

According to Mikael Sandberg, Chairman of VX Fiber, the political and regulatory climate in some nations, such as the UK, has been a point of suffocation when it comes to investments in connectivity infrastructure. This has allowed other nations to leap-frog the UK in pursuit of the riches promised by the digital economy.

The difference between these nations which have made strong progress and those who are lagging, is the ambition of the governments involved and the ability to see the bigger picture. In Portugal or Sweden for example, public/private partnerships to invest in full-fibre infrastructure might expensive but it is very attractive in the long-run.

Sandberg suggested more than 50% of Swedish enterprise organizations have adopted full-fibre connectivity products and the benefits are significant from a productivity perspective. The more successful these businesses are, the more jobs which are brought into the economy and the more tax which is contributed back to the government.

The gains are quite clear both in terms of revenue for the public coffers and political capital gained in the eyes of voting citizens.

And while there are clear and measurable benefits through prioritising such investments, the likes of the UK and Germany have suffered. There have been policies in play which have steered the government away from such lavish spending, austerity measures in the UK for example, though the repercussions of these decisions are perhaps being felt now.

There are still many questions which need to be addressed to fully understand and appreciate the impact of the digital economy, and of course many areas which need to be tackled to mitigate the risks. However, will the right political climate, connectivity infrastructure is looking like an attractive investment to the money men. Unfortunately, there are still countries which haven’t balanced the equation.

  • Cable Next-Gen Technologies & Strategies


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